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U.S. MQ-9 Reaper drones Deploy to Estonia For The First Time In History

MQ-9 Reapers from 52 EOG Detachment 2, based at Miroslawiec AB, in Poland deployed to Amari Air Base on Jun. 14, 2020, marking the very first time the UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) deployed to Estonia.

The purpose of the deployment is to provide ISR (intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance) missions in the Baltic region: a region where several intelligence gathering assets operate every day.

“We are specifically focusing on air, maritime, and land domain,” said Brig. Gen. Jason Hinds, Deputy Director of Operations, Strategic Deterrence and Nuclear Integration and the United States Air Forces in Europe and United States Air Forces Africa Air Operations Center Director. “We are gathering requirements from the U.S. European Command and our NATO allies, and then we are going to execute those taskings in coordination with the Estonian Air Force.”

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Do you have an idea for a drone? The U.S. military wants to hear from you

What if a drone could fly indoors without getting damaged, even if it hit a wall? What if the drone could land on a robotic device, get a new battery and start flying again, all without a person intervening?

For the United States Air Force, this kind of technology could improve national security and the safety of its missions. To develop innovative ideas like these, a group at Hanscom Air Force Base has turned to the same types of companies that have transformed much of the world?s technology: startups.

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ROBOTIC FIGHTER JETS COULD SOON JOIN MILITARY PILOTS ON COMBAT MISSIONS

Military pilots may soon have a new kind of wingman to depend upon: not flesh-and-blood pilots but fast-flying, sensor-studded aerial drones that fly into combat to scout enemy targets and draw enemy fire that otherwise would be directed at human-piloted aircraft.

War planners see these robotic wingmen as a way to amplify air power while sparing pilots? lives and preventing the loss of sophisticated fighter jets, which can cost more than $100 million apiece.

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Robotic fighter jets could soon join military pilots on combat missions. Here’s why.

Military pilots may soon have a new kind of wingman to depend upon: not flesh-and-blood pilots but fast-flying, sensor-studded aerial drones that fly into combat to scout enemy targets and draw enemy fire that otherwise would be directed at human-piloted aircraft.

War planners see these robotic wingmen as a way to amplify air power while sparing pilots’ lives and preventing the loss of sophisticated fighter jets, which can cost more than $100 million apiece.

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Unmanned Systems Cited as Key by Future of Aviation Panelists

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. ? Future naval aviation will benefit from the fifth-generation F-35s, manned-unmanned teaming and the possibility of greatly enhanced rotary wing aircraft being developed under the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program, a panel of Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard officials said.

The naval services also are focusing on improving the readiness of their existing aircraft, and some types of aircraft are coming close to meeting the 80% readiness goal set by former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, the officials told a forum on the future of naval aviation at the Navy League?s annual Sea-Air-Space exposition May 6.

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The Second Drone Age

Finding oneself in the crosshairs of a military drone is, for most people, not the most comforting situation. Yet at an air show last fall, tens of thousands of people had a different reaction. A military drone took off from a runway, and moments later it began transmitting its view to a giant screen on stage. The video from the drone was clear enough to pick out your own face among the crowd. It was exactly what the drone?s pilot, seated in a trailer not far from the stage, was seeing. The crowd was in the crosshairs, and you could see the data about the aircraft?s pitch, roll, and altitude. In the bottom right corner of the screen, the words ?Bore Invalid? indicated the drone was currently unarmed.

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Robot swarms, new aircraft fleets to transform Army aviation

NASHVILLE — In future combat, Army units may deploy a large unmanned aerial system that can serve as a mothership capable of unleashing swarms of autonomous aircraft for various missions. With near-peer competitors advancing their anti-access and area-denial capabilities, the Army requires innovative ways, such as this one, to penetrate through enemy defenses, said Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James C. McConville.

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Will drone bases in the near future be staffed by robots?

If there is a poster child for light-footprint counterinsurgency, it?s the MQ-9 Reaper. Flying over vast swaths of territory and launching missiles at small bands of suspected fighters, Reapers require relatively little on-the-ground support compared to what that same coverage would have required decades ago. Little support is not no support, however, and even drone bases take hundreds of people to run, support, and maintain. It?s likely impossible to reduce the human presence at an airbase to zero, but a pair of technologies suggest a way that drone bases could drastically shrink their labor needs.

c4isrnet.com