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Army Maneuver Officials Want to Buy Ammo Resupply Drones and Give them to BCTs

Army maneuver officials are testing quadcopter drones capable of carrying ammunition, water and other supplies into battle, a “promising” concept that could eliminate the danger of resupplying infantry units in the middle of a gunfight.

“Normally, you would bring the supplies up once you reach some sort of termination, reorganization and consolidation in the fight,” Ed Davis, director of the Maneuver Battle Lab at Fort Benning, Georgia, told Military.com. “What this does is allow you to bring emergency supplies forward while you are still in the fight because it’s unmanned.”

The battle lab kicked off Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiment (AEWE) 2021, during which it plans to refine tactical resupply using improved variants of commercial drones that participated in last year’s experiment, he said.

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The Pentagon is building a school to teach the force how to defeat drones

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon has identified a lack of institutionalized training when it comes to defeating drone threats and is developing a common regimen across the joint force, according to an official with a new office dedicated to countering small unmanned aircraft systems.

The gap was identified during an assessment completed earlier this year and led by the director of operational test and evaluation.

“There are currently no joint linkages or commonality to counter-UAS training across the department,” said Lt. Col. David Morgan, who is with the Joint Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office’s requirements and capabilities division, said during an Oct. 30 C-sUAS capability virtual industry open house.

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If the US Navy isn’t careful, its new unmanned tanker drone could face a 3-year delay

WASHINGTON — The US Navy could face a three-year delay in testing of the MQ-25 Stingray carrier-based tanking drone if it doesn’t get its designated test ships through the required modernizations on time, a possibility the Navy said was remote.

Two carriers — Carl Vinson and George H.W. Bush — have limited windows to complete the installation of unmanned aircraft control stations, and if operational commitments intervene it could create significant issues for the program, according to Navy officials and a government watchdog report.

“Program officials stated that, among other things, the Navy’s potential inability to maintain its schedule commitments could require modifications to the contract that would impact the fixed-price terms,” the Government Accountability Office reported. “Specifically, the Navy faces limited flexibility to install MQ-25 control centers on aircraft carriers.

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Unmanned aircraft could provide low-cost boost for Air Force?s future aircraft inventory, new study says

WASHINGTON ? As the U.S. Air Force looks to increase the size and capability of its aircraft inventory, the service should assess the possibility of using drones as a low-cost and highly available alternative to manned airplanes, posits a new study by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The CSIS report, which was obtained by Defense News and other news outlets ahead of its Oct. 29 release, compares three recent congressionally mandated studies on the Air Force?s future force structure by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments think tank, the federally funded research organization MITRE Corp. and the service itself.

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Jumping into algorithmic warfare: US Army aviation tightens kill chain with networked architecture

NAVAL AIR WEAPONS STATION CHINA LAKE, Calif. ? In the skies above China Lake, California, from the back of an MH-47 Chinook cargo helicopter, an operator with a tablet takes control of a Gray Eagle drone and tasks it with firing a small, precision-glide munition at an enemy target located on the ground. But at the last second, a higher level threat is detected and the munition is rapidly redirected toward a different threat, eliminating it within seconds.

This was made possible through the architecture, automation, autonomy and interfaces capability, or A3I, built by the Army?s Future Vertical Lift Cross-Functional Team under Army Futures Command.

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Do you have an idea for a drone? The U.S. military wants to hear from you

What if a drone could fly indoors without getting damaged, even if it hit a wall? What if the drone could land on a robotic device, get a new battery and start flying again, all without a person intervening?

For the United States Air Force, this kind of technology could improve national security and the safety of its missions. To develop innovative ideas like these, a group at Hanscom Air Force Base has turned to the same types of companies that have transformed much of the world?s technology: startups.

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ROBOTIC FIGHTER JETS COULD SOON JOIN MILITARY PILOTS ON COMBAT MISSIONS

Military pilots may soon have a new kind of wingman to depend upon: not flesh-and-blood pilots but fast-flying, sensor-studded aerial drones that fly into combat to scout enemy targets and draw enemy fire that otherwise would be directed at human-piloted aircraft.

War planners see these robotic wingmen as a way to amplify air power while sparing pilots? lives and preventing the loss of sophisticated fighter jets, which can cost more than $100 million apiece.

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The Navy Will Soon Have a New Weapon to Kill ‘Battleships’ or Submarines

The Navy is moving fast to build new medium- and large-sized armed surface attack drones able to hunt submarines, surveil the air and sea and launch offensive attacks across air, surface and undersea domains.

Called the Medium Unmanned Surface Vehicle (MUSV) and Large Unmanned Surface Vehicle (LUSV) – the new platforms are described by Navy developers as ?anti-surface and strike warfare? vessels.

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Robotic fighter jets could soon join military pilots on combat missions. Here’s why.

Military pilots may soon have a new kind of wingman to depend upon: not flesh-and-blood pilots but fast-flying, sensor-studded aerial drones that fly into combat to scout enemy targets and draw enemy fire that otherwise would be directed at human-piloted aircraft.

War planners see these robotic wingmen as a way to amplify air power while sparing pilots’ lives and preventing the loss of sophisticated fighter jets, which can cost more than $100 million apiece.

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Unmanned Systems Cited as Key by Future of Aviation Panelists

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. ? Future naval aviation will benefit from the fifth-generation F-35s, manned-unmanned teaming and the possibility of greatly enhanced rotary wing aircraft being developed under the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program, a panel of Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard officials said.

The naval services also are focusing on improving the readiness of their existing aircraft, and some types of aircraft are coming close to meeting the 80% readiness goal set by former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, the officials told a forum on the future of naval aviation at the Navy League?s annual Sea-Air-Space exposition May 6.

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