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Before 737 MAX Returns to Service, Airlines Plan to Show It Is Safe

Airlines aren?t leaving it to Boeing Co. and the Federal Aviation Administration to reassure travelers the 737 MAX will be safe to fly. They are devising plans to conduct their own demonstration flights with senior company officials on board to amplify that message.

As regulators consider allowing the jetliners to resume service, eight months after they were grounded world-wide following two deadly accidents, U.S. airlines intend to put the MAX back in the air initially without passengers.

The plans by all three domestic MAX operators partly reflect concerns by airline officials about the need to shore up pilot and passenger confidence in the fleet, according to government and industry officials familiar with the matter.

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After fatal accident, senators ask FAA to speed up aviation safety directives

In the wake of a fatal accident onboard a Southwest Airlines flight, four Democratic senators are demanding to know why it took the FAA two nearly two years to mandate additional inspections of a suspect engine part.

A fatigued engine blade on an April flight from Laguardia to Dallas led to an engine failure while the Boeing 737 cruised at 32,000 feet.

Pilots performed an emergency landing in Philadelphia, but a woman died when debris broke the window and she was partially sucked out. Other passengers managed to pull her back in, but the medical examiner said she died from blunt force trauma of the head, neck and torso.

ABCNews.go.com